5.55am BST
05:55

Summary

Here are the most important developments from the last few hours:

Fewer than one in five of the British public believe the time is right to consider lifting lockdown. The findings, in a new poll for the Observer, suggest Boris Johnson will struggle to convince people to return their lives to normal if he tries to ease the lockdown soon.
Primary schools in England and Wales could reopen for all in June. Children aged five to 11 could return to school from Monday 1 June as part of government plans to gradually ease lockdown measures, the Sunday Telegraph has reported.
Number of people travelling outside home cities in China jumps 50% in a month. The number of people travelling outside their home cities jumped nearly 50% at the start of the Labour Day weekend, compared with the first day of the Tomb Sweeping holiday on 4 April, according to Reuters calculations on data from China’s internet giant Baidu Inc.
Venezuela prison riot leaves 40 dead. A riot erupted at a prison in central Venezuela on Friday, killing at least 40 people and injuring 50 more, including a National Guard officer who was wounded by an explosion and the warden, who suffered a knife wound, authorities said.
European leaders join forces to combat Covid-19. European leaders have pledged to raise billions of pounds to help find a vaccine and treatments for Covid-19 as part of an “international alliance” fighting the disease. An online pledging conference due to be held on Monday will aim to pull in €7.5bn (£6.6bn) in funding to support the global response to the coronavirus pandemic.
YouTube has deleted conspiracy theorist David Icke’s account.The video-sharing site said the 68-year-old violated its policies on sharing information about coronavirus. The former footballer has made controversial unproven claims about the virus on several internet platforms, including one that it is linked to the 5G mobile network.
Nearly 3,000 crew quarantined on cruise ship in German port. Nearly 3,000 crew of a cruise ship belonging to German tourism giant TUI have been quarantined on board after one person tested positive for the novel coronavirus, the company said on Friday.
France proposes 14-day quarantine on entry. Those entering France after the end of lockdown on 11 May could be subjected to a minimum of a fortnight in quarantine as part of a new proposed law which would extend the state of “health emergency” for weeks further.
Businessman Warren Buffett has given an upbeat assessment of the US’ ability to withstand crises.“This is quite an experiment,” Buffett said. “I remain convinced … that nothing can basically stop America.”
Three new cases in Yemen. Fears of an outbreak are growing in the war-ravaged Gulf country after two new cases were confirmed in Aden and one in Taiz province, which is now set to seal its borders.
Cinemagoing habits could see further long-term shift. Lockdown hit Trolls World Tour, an animated musical extravaganza about a group of pop-loving trolls, could become the most important film in recent Hollywood history after amassing digital sales of £80m in three weeks.

5.35am BST
05:35

China has published a short animation titled “Once Upon a Virus” mocking the U.S. response to the new coronavirus using Lego-like figures to represent the two countries, Reuters reports.

US President Donald Trump said on Thursday he was confident the coronavirus may have originated in a Chinese virology lab, but declined to describe the evidence.
In the animation posted online by China’s official Xinhua news agency, red curtains open to reveal a stage featuring Lego-like figures in the form of a terracotta warrior wearing a face mask and the Statue of Liberty.

Washington and Beijing are locked in a war of words over the origins of the disease, which emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan and has grown into a global pandemic.

The United States and other countries have accused China of misleading the world about the severity of the outbreak, and there are growing calls for an international inquiry into the origins of the virus.

Lego’s press office wrote in an emailed statement on Saturday: “We weren’t involved in making the animation in any way.”

5.16am BST
05:16

Nearly 3,000 crew quarantined on cruise ship in German port

Nearly 3,000 crew of a cruise ship belonging to German tourism giant TUI have been quarantined on board after one person tested positive for the novel coronavirus, the company said on Friday.

The Mein Schiff 3 cruise ship stands under quarantine in Cuxhaven, Germany. Photograph: David Hecker/Getty Images

Fifteen crew members of the “Mein Schiff 3” were tested after showing mild flu symptoms, with one of them testing positive for COVID-19.

All 2,899 crew members would remain in quarantine on board in the ship’s home port of Cuxhaven on Germany’s North Sea coast until further notice, TUI said in a statement.

The cruise ship had no passengers on board, TUI added.

TUI, the leader in global tourism, has agreed a 1.8 billion euros ($1.9 billion) bridging loan from the German government to cushion the impact of COVID-19 on one of the hardest-hit sectors.

4.52am BST
04:52

Venezuela prison riot leaves 40 dead

A riot erupted at a prison in central Venezuela on Friday, killing at least 40 people and injuring 50 more, including a National Guard officer who was wounded by an explosion and the warden, who suffered a knife wound, authorities said.

The upheaval at the Llanos Penitentiary Center started with an inmate protest demanding that their relatives be allowed to deliver them food and then an armed confrontation broke out between inmates and guards, lawmaker María Beatriz Martínez told The Associated Press.

Relatives of inmates protest outside Los Llanos penitentiary after a riot erupted inside the prison leaving dozens of deadin Guanare, Venezuela 2 May 2020. Photograph: Reuters

The National Guard officer was injured by a grenade explosion, said Martínez, who had access to an early report prepared by the town’s security forces. The prison is located in the city of Guanare, 450 kilometers (280 miles) south-west of the capital of Caracas.

Venezuela has roughly 30 prisons and 500 jails that can hold an estimated 110,000 inmates. Human rights officials say the prisons are violent and badly overcrowded, with gangs that traffic weapons and drugs in control.

According to the human rights group Venezuelan Prison Observatory, the Guanare prison was built to hold 750 inmates but is jammed beyond capacity with 2,500 inmates.

4.34am BST
04:34

The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Germany increased by 793 to 162,496, data from the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for infectious diseases showed on Sunday.

The reported death toll rose by 74 to 6,649, the tally showed.

A picture taken on 2 May 2020 shows an empty beach with closed wicker beach chairs in the northern German city of Duhnen, near Cuxhaven at the North Sea amid the new coronavirus pandemic. Photograph: Morris Mac Matzen/AFP via Getty Images

For more on the pandemic in Germany at the moment, the Guardian’s Kate Connolly and Kim Willsher have this report on Europe’s schools re-opening:

Playgrounds began reopening in Germany on Friday and pupils aged 11 and 12 are due to return to school in a staggered system starting next week. Classes will be split in two and the groups will alternate between lessons at school and at home.

Hygiene measures being adopted across Europe include strict handwashing and disinfection regimes, physical distancing and the demarcation of playgrounds into zones to ensure pupils do not mix more than necessary. Children will have to file out of classrooms at different times to maintain physical distancing.

Germany has temporarily removed sport and music lessons from the curriculum because they are considered too great a risk, but older pupils already returned to sit exams last month. Nurseries will remain closed for all children, except those of key workers, for the time being.

4.25am BST
04:25

Number of people travelling outside home cities in China jumps 50% in a month

China’s most populous cities saw a spike in outbound travellers, tourists and day-trippers on 1 May, first day of a long holiday weekend, led by Wuhan, epicentre of the coronavirus epidemic that first struck the country late last year.

The number of people travelling outside their home cities jumped nearly 50% at the start of the Labour Day weekend, compared with the first day of the Tomb Sweeping holiday on 4 April, according to Reuters calculations on data from China’s internet giant Baidu Inc.

Women in traditional Chinese dress walk in the park in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, China, 1 May 2020. Photograph: Alex Plavevski/EPA

The increase in outbound travel during the five-day holiday, one of China’s peak tourism periods each year, would help lift the travel and hospitality sectors that have been hit hard by disruption from the coronavirus pandemic.

The spike in tourism was led by increases in travellers from Wuhan, Beijing, Dalian, Tianjin and Jinan, with China having eased curbs on travel and relaxed rules on quarantine amid dwindling cases of the coronavirus.

Hundreds of sightseeing spots have also been reopened, including the Forbidden City in Beijing, as authorities sought to revive and repair local economies.
The country recorded more than 23 million domestic tourists on 1 May, according to China’s culture and tourism ministry.

Hubei’s tourism department said its 22 reopened tourist sites saw 109,664 visitors on 1 May, down 87% from a year ago, while tourism revenue plunged 95% to 6.79 million yuan ($961,729).

Updated
at 4.28am BST

4.05am BST
04:05

As more and more state and local officials announce the release of thousands of at-risk inmates from the nations adult jails and prisons, parents along with children rights groups and criminal justice experts say vulnerable youths should be allowed to serve their time at home, AP reports.

But they say demands for large-scale releases have been largely ignored. Decisions are often not made at the state level, but instead carried out county by county, with individual judges reviewing juvenile cases one by one.

Such legal hurdles have resulted in some kids with symptoms being thrown into isolation for 23 hours a day, in what amounts to solitary confinement, according to relatives and youth advocates. They say many have been cut off from programs, counsellors and school. Some have not been issued masks, social distancing is nearly impossible and they have been given limited access to phone calls home.

One mother reported that her daughter was so cut off from the outside world with no TV and staff not wearing any protective gear that the girl had no idea a deadly virus was even circulating in America. In some states, authorities have been shuttling kids between facilities, trying to make sure sick and healthy young people are kept apart.

Growing fears and frustrations have led to violence and mayhem not just in Louisiana, but at juvenile centres in other coronavirus hot spots such as New York. Young people are calling their parents to say they’re scared and desperate to escape. Sheriffs deputies responded to a facility in Portland, Oregon, this month after a disturbance broke out, but no injuries were reported.

3.45am BST
03:45

The Bolshoi ballet held its first online classes only this week, more than a month after lockdown began, AFP reports.

In the middle of their bedroom, Bolshoi ballet dancers Margarita Shrainer and Igor Tsvirko have placed a linoleum mat and a barre. Since the start of the lockdown, the couple, both soloists in the legendary troupe, have largely used their own initiative to keep up their dance skills at home.

Yet Tsvirko and Shrainer still look toned and Tsvirko pulls at his waistband. “I don’t think I’ve got fat, that’s the main thing,” says the 30-year-old dancer, a leading soloist at the Bolshoi who has performed lead roles in “Ivan the Terrible” and “Nureyev”.

Russian Bolshoi Ballet principal dancers Maria Alexandrova and Vladislav Lantratov attend an online training with their ballet partners at home in Moscow. Photograph: Pavel Golovkin/AP

Shrainer, a first soloist who has performed major roles in “Coppelia” and “Carmen Suite”, massages her leg with a tennis ball and moves into the splits.

Together for more than a year, they are living in a studio flat owned by the theatre. The same block is home to several other dancers and it was outside this building that the notorious acid attack on then-artistic director Sergei Filin took place in 2013.

Their Zoom class is led by a teacher doing steps in his bedroom to a piano accompaniment.

3.26am BST
03:26

Mexico’s health ministry reported 1,349 new known coronavirus cases and 89 more deaths on Saturday, bringing the country’s total to 22,088 cases and 2,061 deaths.

The head of Mexico’s consumer protection agency, Ricardo Sheffield, said on Twitter on Saturday he had tested positive, becoming at least the second high-ranking federal government official with the virus.

Ricardo Sheffield
(@SheffieldGto)

Les comparto que salí positivo de coronavirus, la prueba me la hice el martes pasado, pero hoy por la tarde me dió aviso el laboratorio. Ya estoy en comunicación con el doctor @HLGatell y estaré atendiendo las recomendaciones médicas.

May 2, 2020

3.18am BST
03:18

China reported two new coronavirus cases for 2 May, up from one the day before, data from the country’s national health authority showed on Sunday.

One case was imported and the other was local, the National Health Commission (NHC) said. This compares to one imported case and no domestic transmissions on 1 May.

The NHC also reported 12 asymptomatic cases for May 2, down from 20 the day before.

The number of confirmed cases in China has reached 82,877. With no new deaths reported, the death toll remained at 4,633.

People wearing face masks visit Zhongshan Park on the second day of the 5-day International Workers’ Day holiday on 2 May 2020 in Wuhan, Hubei Province of China. Photograph: China News Service/China News Service via Getty Images

3.06am BST
03:06

AFP has this equine report from Germany:

Every morning white mare Jenny leaves her stable to stroll through her Frankfurt neighbourhood. Bringing trams to a halt and smiles to people’s faces, the free-roaming horse is brightening up the coronavirus lockdown for many.

“Everyone else has to live with coronavirus restrictions but Jenny is as free as ever,” her owner Anna Weischedel, 65, told AFP.

25-year-old horse named Jenny strolls through the streets followed by a small dog during her daily walk in Fechenheim near Frankfurt am Main, western Germany, on 28 April 2020. Photograph: Daniel Roland/AFP via Getty Images

For more than a decade Jenny has wandered solo through her local Fechenheim area, a green part of Frankfurt on the bank of the Main river. She explores the high street, trots along the tram line to a nearby field and spends hours nibbling on patches of grass. The beloved Arabian mare, already a venerable 25 years old, has always been a hit with residents. But never more so than in recent weeks.

Like many countries, Germany has closed schools, playgrounds and many businesses to curb the outbreak. Though it has slowly started easing some lockdown measures, people are encouraged to limit their social interactions and keep their distance.

Jenny stands next to her owners Anna (C) and Werner Weischedel as she is getting ready for her daily walk in Fechenheim near Frankfurt am Main, western Germany, on 28 April 2020. Photograph: Daniel Roland/AFP via Getty Images

2.47am BST
02:47

Why is Australia’s Covid commission backing a fertiliser plant as its top recovery project?

When the Daily Telegraph reported last week that a fertiliser plant in Narrabri being advanced by a West Australian businessman had topped the list of the projects being promoted by the National Covid Coordination Commission, there was some surprise.

Vikas Rambal and Perdaman Chemicals and Fertilisers are not exactly household names, and the controversial Narrabri coal seam gas project – which would provide the cheap gas that the fertiliser project depends on – is yet to be approved by the New South Wales government.

The commission considered fertilisers to be one of the biggest opportunities, along with petrochemicals and methanol, the executive chairman of the Covid commission, Nev Power, the former Fortescue Metals chief executive, told the Telegraph.

“A cracking idea,” the energy minister, Angus Taylor, told the Telegraph in response to Power’s touting of the Perdaman project.

“I like to think of the other side of Covid-19 as being a gas-fired recovery,” Taylor said.

Just why Power has chosen to promote this project in his quest to rebuild the nation is unclear.



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