8.07pm GMT
20:07

The first study of the safety and effectiveness of a coronavirus vaccine in Iran began on Tuesday, state TV reported, with dozens due to receive the domestically developed shot even as details about its production remained slim.

The vaccine, the first in the country to reach human trials, is produced by Shifa Pharmed, part of a state-owned pharmaceutical conglomerate known as Barekat.

The company’s website describes it as involved in the large-scale production of antibiotics and penicillin, without offering any details about its coronavirus research, results of animal trials or previous vaccine development since its founding in 1995.

Iran has struggled to stem the worst virus outbreak in the region, which has infected over 1.2 million people and killed nearly 55,000.

The study, a phase 1 clinical trial, will enrol a total of 56 volunteers to receive two shots of the Iranian vaccine within two weeks, according to Hamed Hosseini, a clinical trial manager.

Results are to be announced roughly a month after the second shot. Three people received the first injections on Tuesday in a ceremony at a Tehran hotel attended by the country’s health minister.

State TV announced that none of the injections had so far caused any “fevers” or “bodily shocks.”

I am happy that the scientific process went ahead in a proper way,” said Tayebeh Mokhber, daughter of the Setad Foundation chairman, who was the first to get jabbed. “I hope the conclusion will be health for our people.”

Updated
at 8.23pm GMT

7.52pm GMT
19:52

The Algerian president, Abdelmadjid Tebboune, has returned home after being treated for Covid-19 in Germany, state television reported on Tuesday.

Tebboune’s absence since the end of October has fuelled speculation over whether he will finish his first term.

Updated
at 8.23pm GMT

7.38pm GMT
19:38

The French health minister, Olivier Véran, said the government could soon impose an earlier curfew that would start at 6pm instead of 8pm in eastern areas due to the spread of the coronavirus.

Veran added there were currently no plans to impose a third lockdown, despite the daily new Covid-19 case count being more than twice as high as the government’s target of less than 5,000.

Updated
at 8.24pm GMT

7.25pm GMT
19:25

Germany could offer shots against the coronavirus to all who want them by the summer if a third vaccine from either Johnson & Johnson, AstraZeneca or CureVac wins EU approval, the country’s health minister, Jens Spahn, said.

Spahn was grilled during an interview broadcast live on the website of mass-selling Bild newspaper about media reports that Germany had so far only received 4m doses of Pfizer Inc’s and BioNTech’s vaccine compared with 5m shots secured by Israel, whose population is one-tenth of Germany’s.

“We have not ordered insufficiently,” Spahn said. “We expect on the whole some 130 million doses from Moderna and BioNTech, which will be enough to offer the vaccine to anyone wishing to be vaccinated.”

Asked when the country would be in a position to make the vaccine available to all those wishing to have it, Spahn said: “It depends if we get more approvals, meaning Johnson & Johnson, AstraZeneca and CureVac. If one or two additional vaccines get approval, I think we will reach that point toward summer.”

Germany at the weekend rolled out the BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine developed by the German biotech company with its US partner, starting in care homes where death rates are highest.

Updated
at 7.33pm GMT

7.13pm GMT
19:13

Denmark extends lockdown for a fortnight

Denmark has extended a hard lockdown for two weeks, until 17 January, to limit the spread of Covid-19, following a drastic spike in new infections over the past month, the country’s prime minister said on Tuesday.

The situation regarding infection rates, hospitalisations and deaths is now even more serious than in the spring,” Mette Frederiksen told a press briefing.

The extension of the current country-wide restrictions announced on December 16 will keep schools, shopping malls, restaurants, bars and other non-essential shops closed, Frederiksen said.
The Nordic country had fared relatively well through the pandemic until December, when the number of new infections more than doubled compared with the previous month. “The scenario we feared in the spring may become a reality in the coming weeks and months if we don’t act now,” Frederiksen said. Denmark on Tuesday reported 2,621 new cases among its population of 5.8 million over the past 24 hours, while the number of new hospitalisations rose by 28 to a record 900, close to the maximum capacity of its Covid-19 wards.

Updated
at 7.28pm GMT

7.03pm GMT
19:03

France records rise in people admitted to hospital for Covid-19

The French health ministry reported 11,395 new coronavirus infections over the past 24 hours on Tuesday, jumping above the 10,000 threshold for the first time in four days.

France, which launched its gradual vaccination campaign on Sunday, saw the number of people hospitalised for the disease rise for the fourth day running, a sequence unseen since 13 November.
France’s cumulative total of cases now stands at 2,574,041, the fifth-highest in the world.

The seven-day moving average of new infections, which averages out weekly data reporting irregularities, stands at 11,871, more than twice as high as the government’s target of fewer than 5,000.

The Covid-19 death toll was up by 969, at 64,078, versus a seven day moving average of 339.

Updated
at 7.29pm GMT

6.51pm GMT
18:51

A man charged with two counts of murder in the deaths of a couple in the US has died from Covid-19 complications while in custody awaiting trial, an official said.

Craig Pennington, 56, died at Norton Healthcare in Louisville, Marion County detention center‘s chief of security, Irvin Mann, told news outlets.

Mann said Pennington was taken to hospital on 11 December for shortness of breath and tested positive for Covid-19.

Pennington was charged in July 2016 with killing 38-year-old Robert K Jones and 35-year-old Crystal J Warner.

Warner and Jones, both of Florence, went missing on 3 July and their bodies were later found in different counties.

Pennington had pleaded not guilty to murder and other charges and was scheduled for a pretrial conference on 15 January, according to court records.

Ten out of about 215 inmates at the jail were infected with Covid-19 as of Tuesday morning, Mann said.

Updated
at 7.31pm GMT

6.31pm GMT
18:31

Ireland records highest daily tally of cases

Ireland reported the highest Covid-19 cases in a single day on Tuesday with 1,546 infections, up from a previous record of 1,296 on Saturday.

The government is to meet on Wednesday to consider additional restrictions to try to control a surge that began after public health measures were eased in early December when Ireland had the lowest infection rate in the European Union.

Updated
at 6.32pm GMT

6.24pm GMT
18:24

Nigeria faces oxygen supply challenges to treat coronavirus patients in parts of the country and unacceptable laboratory delays as case numbers rose to the highest recorded in a single week, health authorities said.

The warnings from officials come as the resurgent virus strikes across much of the world, bringing greater case loads and hospitalisations.

“There is an on-going review of the chain for the supply of medical oxygen for our medical facilities across the nation,” said Boss Mustapha, chairman of Nigeria’s coronavirus task force, naming the capital of Abuja as an area of concern.

Labs’ “inability to function optimally has resulted in unacceptable levels of delay in receiving results,” he added, calling on Nigeria’s state governments to reopen all laboratories, ensure prompt testing and keep open treatment centres.

“This is not helping our national response.”

Nigeria has recorded few coronavirus cases compared to others on the continent.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, officials count 84,811 as of Tuesday evening, with 1,264 deaths.

6.08pm GMT
18:08

A senior US public health official said on Tuesday the coronavirus testing the United States now is requiring for travellers from Britain should probably be extended to other countries as well.

“I think that probably should be extended to other countries,” US assistant secretary for health Brett Giroir told MSNBC.



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