news, latest-news,

Experts are warning of the long-term impact people could feel after withdrawing from their retirement fund, as figures reveal the extent of the federal government’s COVID-19 early release for super program across western NSW. Statistics provided by Industry Super Australia show residents across the federal electorates of Calare and Parkes withdrew roughly $400 million from their super under relaxed restrictions, with almost 7,000 accounts being drained completely. The December report showed almost 40,000 people across the two electorates took up the government’s offer to access up to $20,000 of their superannuation early, the program was designed to alleviate financial burden caused by the coronavirus pandemic. The program, which ended on December 31, allowed eligible Australians to withdraw $10,000 before June 30 and another $10,000 after July 1 and the numbers indicate the loss of super savings across western NSW amounts to $396 million. In Calare, which includes major regional centres Orange and Bathurst, the figures show 19,648 individuals accessed their superannuation and 3,594 wiped their accounts clean, with $204.8 million being paid out across the electorate. ALSO READ: Chef bakes more than 500 boxes of cookies to help those in need Across the Parkes electorate, which includes Dubbo, 18,313 people were paid out a combined total of $191.2 million and 3,266 accounts were reduced to zero. Granted, those numbers may be slightly skewed considering that electorate stretches well into the northern reaches of the state. The average amount paid out across each region was a touch over $7,500, but allowing for those who used both opportunities to access their super the average withdrawal per person sat at $9,721. Orange Financial Planning owner Tyron Mitchell explained the flow-on effects from accessing super early could be substantial, with analysis by Industry Super Australia also indicating a 30-year-old who withdraws $20,000 could have up to $80,000 less at retirement. “There is that potential long-term impact when you’re thinking about compound interest and the return of investment from the money that was withdrawn, definitely,” Mr Mitchell said. “But in saying that, we do need to remember that in some circumstances there was a bigger picture. “With job losses and that sort of thing some people accessed their superannuation to survive and that’s okay, a lot of people needed to. “For anyone who did access their super though, the best piece of advice I could give them is to go and see their financial planner and start talking about some of salary sacrifice, because it can be done without it impacting your cash flow.” ALSO READ: Has Orange become the new roundabout capital of Australia? The government’s increase in super rates guarantee now appears to be all the more important. They’re legislated to rise – from 9.5 per cent – by half a per cent each year before reaching a final value of 12 per cent in 2025. There is growing opposition as the political divide on super intensifies though, whether employers would withhold pay rises as a result of super increases is one fiercely debated topic. Industry Super Australia chief executive Bernie Dean said that promised rate increase is essential, saying it would be a ‘cruel blow’ if it was to be scrapped. ALSO READ: Drivers on notice as double demerits kick in for Operation Australia Day “The young NSW workers who had to sacrifice their retirement savings to support themselves during the pandemic had been promised a super boost to make it up,” he said. “Ripping it away from them would be a cruel double blow, it would leave them with far less at retirement and saddle these young workers with a whopping pension bill they pay for through higher taxes. “Super is not a cookie jar for government to raid to solve short-term budget problems, nor is it for housing. Busting into super early comes at a steep cost for the individual and future taxpayers, as a society we shouldn’t be demanding our young people pay the price yet again.” The Central Western Daily relies on your support to keep doing what we do. If you’re not already a subscriber, please consider coming on board. For as little as $3 a week for full digital access, a subscription represents great value.

/images/transform/v1/crop/frm/Qrs2cpbWHRW8qVd3GhSkX2/19212728-907e-46ef-879a-0cae36704ba5.jpg/r2_0_618_348_w1200_h678_fmax.jpg

Experts are warning of the long-term impact people could feel after withdrawing from their retirement fund, as figures reveal the extent of the federal government’s COVID-19 early release for super program across western NSW.

Statistics provided by Industry Super Australia show residents across the federal electorates of Calare and Parkes withdrew roughly $400 million from their super under relaxed restrictions, with almost 7,000 accounts being drained completely.

The December report showed almost 40,000 people across the two electorates took up the government’s offer to access up to $20,000 of their superannuation early, the program was designed to alleviate financial burden caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

There is potential long-term impact when you’re thinking about compound interest and the return of investment from that money that was withdrawn.

Orange Financial Planning owner Tyron Mitchell

The program, which ended on December 31, allowed eligible Australians to withdraw $10,000 before June 30 and another $10,000 after July 1 and the numbers indicate the loss of super savings across western NSW amounts to $396 million.

In Calare, which includes major regional centres Orange and Bathurst, the figures show 19,648 individuals accessed their superannuation and 3,594 wiped their accounts clean, with $204.8 million being paid out across the electorate.

Across the Parkes electorate, which includes Dubbo, 18,313 people were paid out a combined total of $191.2 million and 3,266 accounts were reduced to zero. Granted, those numbers may be slightly skewed considering that electorate stretches well into the northern reaches of the state.

The average amount paid out across each region was a touch over $7,500, but allowing for those who used both opportunities to access their super the average withdrawal per person sat at $9,721.

Orange Financial Planning owner Tyron Mitchell explained the flow-on effects from accessing super early could be substantial, with analysis by Industry Super Australia also indicating a 30-year-old who withdraws $20,000 could have up to $80,000 less at retirement.

“There is that potential long-term impact when you’re thinking about compound interest and the return of investment from the money that was withdrawn, definitely,” Mr Mitchell said.

“But in saying that, we do need to remember that in some circumstances there was a bigger picture.

“With job losses and that sort of thing some people accessed their superannuation to survive and that’s okay, a lot of people needed to.

“For anyone who did access their super though, the best piece of advice I could give them is to go and see their financial planner and start talking about some of salary sacrifice, because it can be done without it impacting your cash flow.”

The government’s increase in super rates guarantee now appears to be all the more important.

They’re legislated to rise – from 9.5 per cent – by half a per cent each year before reaching a final value of 12 per cent in 2025.

There is growing opposition as the political divide on super intensifies though, whether employers would withhold pay rises as a result of super increases is one fiercely debated topic.

Industry Super Australia chief executive Bernie Dean said that promised rate increase is essential, saying it would be a ‘cruel blow’ if it was to be scrapped.

“The young NSW workers who had to sacrifice their retirement savings to support themselves during the pandemic had been promised a super boost to make it up,” he said.

“Ripping it away from them would be a cruel double blow, it would leave them with far less at retirement and saddle these young workers with a whopping pension bill they pay for through higher taxes.

“Super is not a cookie jar for government to raid to solve short-term budget problems, nor is it for housing. Busting into super early comes at a steep cost for the individual and future taxpayers, as a society we shouldn’t be demanding our young people pay the price yet again.”

The Central Western Daily relies on your support to keep doing what we do. If you’re not already a subscriber, please consider coming on board. For as little as $3 a week for full digital access, a subscription represents great value.

Send us a letter to the editor using the form below …



Source link