The latest coronavirus news from Canada and around the world Sunday. This file will be updated throughout the day. Web links to longer stories if available.

7 p.m.: Health-care workers across Ontario still struggle to obtain personal protective equipment to shield them from COVID-19, three major unions said Sunday as they called on the province to do more to ensure their safety as the pandemic rages on.

Unifor, the health-care arm of the Service Employees International Union and the Canadian Union of Public Employees also called for a “universal wage” of $25 an hour for all personal support workers regardless of what part of the provincial system they work in.

Both messages are part of a provincewide public awareness campaign set to launch in workplaces on Monday.

The secretary-treasurer of CUPE’s Ontario Council of Hospital Unions said many workers were denied access to PPE at the beginning of the pandemic, contending it was often kept under lock and key by employers.

Sharon Richer said that practice continues today in some cases, despite assurances from the province that it has a stockpile of 12.4 million pieces of PPE such as N95 masks.

“We’re asked to work with a deadly virus,” she said. “We’re not provided with the tools to protect ourselves and not supported if we become ill from it. We demand better from this government and our employers.”

The unions, which represent 175,000 health-care workers, say thousands of them have contracted COVID-19 throughout the pandemic and 20 have died from the virus.

Richer said early in the pandemic there was debate about how COVID-19 was spread and N95 masks were difficult to obtain.

But as the pandemic nears its one-year anniversary, she argued there is no excuse not to provide workers with vital protective gear.

“The masks were very scarce,” Richer said. “They’re not now. … We shouldn’t have to go into work on a daily basis and beg for protection to keep us safe from this virus.”

6:30 p.m.: COVID-19 continues to spread in an outbreak in Nunavut.

The territory says there are four new cases in Arviat, the only community where there are active cases.

Arviat, which has a population of about 2,800, has had 337 COVID-19 cases, 25 of which are currently active.

All schools and non-essential businesses in Arviat have been closed for months and travel has been restricted.

6 p.m.: Two groups on Monday are holding a rally at the state Capitol in Austin against Gov. Greg Abbott’s order lifting the statewide mask mandate in public places.

The Amplified Sound Coalition and the Austin chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America will be protesting Monday outside the south steps of the Capitol.

Protesters are asking the governor not to relax the mask mandate until 70% of the state’s essential workers are vaccinated.

“Let’s show our government what the masked faces of sacrificial employees look like,” Jeanette Gregor, the co-founder of Amplified Sound Coalition, said on a video posted on the group’s Facebook page.

“This is not a political issue. This is a class issue and we have just been given the ultimate backhand by our government,” she said.

The coalition represents music industry workers. Gregor in the video also asked for essential workers, including restaurant employees, to come to the rally.

6 p.m.: Alberta’s chief medical health officer says there are an estimated 300 new COVID-19 cases, but says firm information isn’t available today due to a system upgrade.

Dr. Deena Hinshaw says on Twitter that the new cases include 54 that involve variants of concern.

Information was not available Sunday on the number of hospitalizations or new deaths.

Hinshaw says about 8,100 COVID-19 tests were completed in the previous 24 hours, and that the positivity rate was approximately four per cent.

She says the system upgrade work is nearly complete and that online updates will resume Monday.

4:35 p.m.: Health officials in Atlantic Canada reported seven new cases of COVID-19 today, including two in Prince Edward Island.

Officials in that province say both new patients are men in their 20s who are now self-isolating.

With 26 active reported cases, chief public health officer Dr. Heather Morrison says there are more active infections on the Island now than at any other point in the pandemic.

The province is under so-called circuit-breaker measures until March 14, which require all businesses and services to operate at reduced capacity and keep records for contact tracing.

Public health authorities in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia reported two new cases in their respective provinces and say all infections are connected to travel or to previously known infections.

Officials in Newfoundland and Labrador reported one new travel-related case, marking the province’s 10th consecutive day with single-digit infection numbers following an outbreak last month in the St. John’s region.

4:30 p.m.: Provinces in Canada are fond of telling the big bad federal government to mind its own business, writes Star columnist Susan Delacourt.

So it was somewhat unexpected this week to see provincial premiers inserting themselves into the ongoing debate over when and how Canada could be tipped into a federal election as soon as this spring. Technically, this would be Ottawa’s business.

Quebec Premier François Legault, host of the meeting on Thursday between provincial and territorial leaders, opened that door when he laid out the unanimous demand for Justin Trudeau’s government to put big increases for health transfers in the coming budget.

If Trudeau isn’t willing to do it, Legault said, the provinces have other friends in Ottawa who might be more accommodating.

“We have a minority government, so we’ve already met with the representatives of the opposition parties in Ottawa,” Legault said. “I think if we’re not able to settle all the problems in the next budget, we’ll continue.”

It’s not entirely clear what “we’ll continue” means, but the premiers — being political people themselves — would have known what they were doing on Thursday. They were handing the opposition parties a reason to pull the plug on Trudeau’s government over the budget, expected to be delivered in April.

Read Susan Delacourt’s column here.

4:25 p.m. (Updated): Ontario is reporting another 1,299 COVID-19 cases and 15 more deaths, according to its latest report released Sunday morning.

The seven-day average is at 1,069 cases daily.

The province says 46,586 tests were completed the previous day, and a 3.1 per cent positivity rate.

There are 606 people currently hospitalized with COVID-19 in the province, including 273 patients in intensive care. There are 179 people on ventilators.

As often observed on weekends, more than 10 per cent of hospitals did not submit data, the province says.

Ontario has administered 30,192 vaccine doses since its last daily update, with 890,604 doses given in total as of 8 p.m. Saturday. The province says 271,807 people have completed their vaccinations, which means they’ve had both doses.

Locally, Health Minister Christine Elliott says there are 329 new cases in Toronto, 192 in Peel and 116 in York Region.

Meanwhile, there were no recorded deaths in long-term care for the second straight day. It’s the first time since Sept. 12-13 that this has happened, a reflection of the province’s vaccination efforts to prioritize long-term care residents.

(On March 3, there were also zero deaths, and -1 was recorded the day before, likely a result of data cleanup).

In total, there have been 3,748 resident deaths and 11 staff deaths since the pandemic began, in the latest report released by the province.

Read the full story from Cheyenne Bholla here.

4 p.m.: There’s a photo saved in my phone that I’ve held close over the past year, writes Star reporter Jenna Moon.

It’s a selfie from my birthday party, shortly before COVID-19 was even referred to as a pandemic. In it, I’m standing with my sister. We’re lit purple from the blue neon lights that rimmed the ceiling of the bar. Her face is pressed into my hair, head resting against mine.

Looking at it now, it feels surreal to be standing so close to someone — unmasked and indoors — that I wouldn’t see again in person for months.

I just ‘celebrated’ a first lockdown birthday one of the last few to check that box since lockdown measures came into effect nearly a year ago. In just a couple of weeks, so many others will be facing a second birthday under the restrictions brought on by COVID-19.

While the pandemic forced couples to cancel weddings and new parents to welcome babies alone, the passing of a birthday in isolation has felt to me like a strange way to mark a year that has felt both incredibly long and infinitesimal.

It’s also an indication of a year gone by while life stands still. For millennials in their late 20s and early 30s, a mix of personal milestones and the societal expectations of settling down, moving out or starting a new career have been put on hold by the pandemic. A tweet looking for sources for this story garnered countless Twitter messages and emails.

Read the full story from Jenna Moon here.

3:45 p.m.: Toronto is reporting 393 new COVID-19 cases, with eight more deaths.

3:40 p.m.: Health authorities across British Columbia will start booking COVID-19 vaccination appointments Monday for people 90 years old and older and Indigenous residents over the age of 65.

The province says vaccine call centres will open at 7 a.m. at the Fraser, Island, Interior, Northern and Vancouver health authorities to make appointments for seniors to receive their shots.

The B.C. government website says people can book appointments for themselves or their spouse, and family members or friends are also permitted to make a booking on someone else’s behalf.

The website says callers to health authorities will be asked to provide the person’s first and last name, date of birth, postal code and personal health number.

The website says people born in 1936 or earlier can start calling for appointments on March 15 and those born in 1941 or earlier can start scheduling their shots on March 22.

Island Health says in a statement Sunday it will operate 19 community clinics where more than 40,000 people will receive their first COVID-19 vaccines over the next month.

3:10 p.m.: Canada’s chief public health officer is expressing hope for the future as the world prepares to mark the one-year anniversary of the COVID-19 crisis.

The World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic last March 11, and Dr. Theresa Tam says it’s been a difficult 12 months marked by hardship and sacrifice.

But she says it’s been “a good week” for Canada’s vaccination program thanks to the recent approvals of the Johnson & Johnson and Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccines.

Tam says the addition of the two new vaccines will help Canadians get immunized faster and help ease the worries surrounding supply disruptions or setbacks.

The anniversary comes as all provinces are expanding their mass vaccination programs and some are loosening restrictions aimed at limiting the spread of the virus.

A stay-at-home order in Ontario’s Toronto, Peel and North Bay regions will lift on Monday, while five Quebec regions will be downgraded from red to orange on the province’s colour-coded regional alert system.

3 p.m.: Saskatchewan is reporting two new deaths among people who tested positive for COVID-19, one of whom was under 20 years old.

The exact age of that person was not released, but the government’s daily pandemic update says the patient was from Saskatchewan’s North West zone.

The other person who died was in the 40-to-49 age group and was from the Far North West zone.

The province is reporting 116 new COVID-19 cases today.

The government says a shipment of 7,022 doses of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is expected to arrive Tuesday and will be divided between Saskatoon and Regina.

Another 7,020 doses of that vaccine are expected Wednesday and will go to North Battleford, Yorkton and Prince Albert.

2:45 p.m.: Public health officials in New Brunswick are reporting two new cases of COVID-19.

Authorities say one case is related to travel and the other is connected to a previously known infection.

Effective midnight tonight, officials are loosening public health restrictions across the entire province.

In the new provincewide “yellow” alert level, residents can expand their contacts from 10 to 15 people and team sports activities may resume.

2:10 p.m.: Manitoba health officials are reporting two new deaths of people with COVID-19.

The province’s daily pandemic update says both deaths were in the Winnipeg health region and are linked to outbreaks at care facilities.

The province says there were 56 new COVID-19 cases in Manitoba as of this morning.

1:20 p.m.: Newfoundland and Labrador health authorities are reporting one new case of COVID-19 today.

Officials say the person involved is a man between 20 and 39 years old, and his infection is related to international travel.

The province has now seen 10 consecutive days of single-digit case counts following an outbreak in St. Jon’s last month.

Public health says there are 87 active reported COVID-19 cases in the province, including three people in intensive care.

1 p.m.: Nova Scotia health authorities are reporting two new cases of COVID-19.

Officials say one infection is travel-related, while the other is a close contact of a previously known case.

There are now 29 active reported COVID-19 infections in the province.

Authorities say two patients are in hospital and one is in intensive care.

12:40 p.m. (updated): Quebec is reporting 707 new cases of COVID-19 and seven more deaths today, as much of the province prepares to transition to the lower orange alert level of pandemic-related public health restrictions.

Two of the deaths occurred in the past 24 hours while the rest happened earlier or at an unknown date.

Hospitalizations declined by nine to 592, with 107 people in intensive care, which is two fewer than the day before.

The Quebec government announced last week that it would ease restrictions in most of the province on March 8, with the exception of Montreal and the surrounding regions where restaurant dining rooms remain closed and an 8 p.m. curfew remains in effect.

Quebec City and four other regions will move to the lower, “orange’’ pandemic-alert level, which means more businesses can open and the start of the nighttime curfew will be pushed back to 9:30 p.m

The province administered 15,329 doses of vaccine on Saturday, and has promised to ramp up its campaign this week as more regions begin mass vaccination of the general public, beginning with older seniors.

11:55 a.m. (updated): The NBA announces that Philadelphia 76ers’ Ben Simmons and Joel Embiid will not play in tonight’s all-star game in Atlanta due to contact tracing.

They were exposed to a person who had a positive test in Philadelphia, reportedly their barber.

Embiid was supposed to be a starter for Team Durant. Simmons was a reserve for Team LeBron. The NBA and the 76ers learned of the situation on Saturday night, coach Doc Rivers said.

A person with knowledge of the situation told The Associated Press that the contact was with a barber who is regularly tested for COVID-19 and often works with Embiid and Simmons. Both Embiid and Simmons saw the barber in recent days and have continued to test negative, said the person, who spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity Sunday because those details were not released publicly.

In past cases where contact tracing has detected an issue, players have been cleared when the suspected positive person’s subsequent tests have come back negative for COVID-19.

The Athletic and ESPN first reported that Embiid’s and Simmons’ status were in doubt for Sunday’s game.

Many NBA players have missed several days this season after contact tracing issues, which means a player has been exposed to someone who tested positive for COVID-19. The NBA goes through a process of determining if a player has been exposed; it can take a day or more before determining how long — or if — the player must quarantine and be away from his team.

10:35 a.m.: Ontario is also reporting no new deaths in long-term care for the second straight day so the number of resident deaths remains the same at 3,748.

The province says one more long-term-care home is in outbreak for a total of 84 or 13.4 per cent of all LTC homes in the province.

10:25 a.m.: Ontario is reporting 1,299 more COVID-19 cases, and 15 deaths.

Nearly 46,600 tests were completed.

Locally, there are 329 new cases in Toronto, 192 in Peel and 116 in York Region.

10:20 a.m.: Ontario is reporting that 30,192 additional vaccine doses were administered since its last daily report for 890,604 as of 8 p.m. Saturday.

The province says 271,807 people are fully vaccinated which means they’ve had both vaccine shots.

8 a.m.: While thousands of Ontario tenants have faced eviction notices over missed rent during COVID-19, and some landlords have filed hundreds of applications with the Landlord Tenant Board (LTB), Skyline Living says it’s escalated a tenant support program first launched in 2018. It aims to avoid the LTB process for tenants who fall behind in its buildings in cities like Peterborough and Guelph.

First, the company connects tenants with external supports like rent banks, government funding and local organizations. Once those options are exhausted, tenants can apply to the company for help, which can include writing off their debts. Through the program, tenants can also access help paying for other expenses, from groceries to bill payments and school supplies.

Read more from the Star’s Victoria Gibson.

6:37 a.m.: Russia’s boast in August that it was the first country to authorize a coronavirus vaccine led to skepticism at the time because of its insufficient testing. Six months later, as demand for the Sputnik V vaccine grows, experts are raising questions again — this time, over whether Moscow can keep up with all the orders from the countries that want it.

Slovakia got 200,000 doses on March 1, even though the European Medicines Agency, the European Union’s pharmaceutical regulator, only began reviewing its use on Thursday in an expedited process. The president of the hard-hit Czech Republic said he wrote directly to Russian President Vladimir Putin to get a supply. Millions of doses are expected by countries in Latin America, Africa, the former Soviet Union and the Middle East in a wave of Russian vaccine diplomacy.

“Sputnik V continues to confidently conquer Europe,” anchor Olga Skabeyeva declared on the Russia-1 state TV channel.

Dmitry Kiselev, the network’s top pro-Kremlin anchor, heaped on the hyperbole last month, blustering: “The Russian coronavirus vaccine, Sputnik V, is the best in the world.”

State TV channels have covered vaccine exports extensively, citing praise from abroad for Russia and running segments about the difficulties countries are having with Western vaccines.

6:36 a.m.: Tensions were raw ahead of midnight as Republican leader Mitch McConnell rose in the Senate for the purpose of publicly ridiculing Majority Leader Chuck Schumer over the daylong delay as Democrats argued among themselves over the $1.9 trillion COVID-19 rescue package.

But 12 hours later, it was Schumer, D-N.Y., reveling in the last word, an unabashedly upbeat “help is on the way” to Americans suffering through the pandemic and lockdowns as the Senate prepared to approve the massive package without a single GOP vote.

Senate passage of the sweeping relief bill Saturday puts President Joe Biden’s top priority closer to becoming law, poised to unleash billion for vaccines, $1,400 direct payments and other aid, and shows Schumer, in his first big test as majority leader, can unify the ever-so-slim Democratic majority and deliver the votes.

“Lessons learned: If we have unity, we can do big things,” Schumer told The Associated Press in an interview after the vote.

The outcome “gives us optimism about doing more big things in the future — because it worked,” he said.

Stewardship of the massive pandemic relief package was an inaugural foray of the new power dynamics of Washington, testing Democratic control of the White House and Congress for the first time in a decade, and setting the foundation for what’s possible for Biden’s agenda.

6:23 a.m.: Israel reopened most of its economy Sunday as part of its final phase of lifting coronavirus lockdown restrictions, some of them in place since September.

The easing of restrictions comes after months of government-imposed shutdowns and less than three weeks before the country’s fourth parliamentary elections in two years. Israel, a world leader in vaccinations per capita, has surged forward with immunizing nearly 40% of its population in just over two months.

Bars and restaurants, event halls, sporting events, hotels and all primary and secondary schools that had been closed to the public for months could reopen with some restrictions in place on the number of people in attendance, and with certain places open to the vaccinated only.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government approved the easing of limitations Saturday night, including the reopening of the main international airport to a limited number of incoming passengers each day.

6 a.m.: The economic and life disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has prompted some recent immigrants to leave Canada and return to their countries of origin, where they have more social and family connections.

The number of permanent residents who have been in Canada for less than five years declined by four per cent to 1,019,000 by the end of 2020 from 1,060,000 the year before, according to an analysis of Statistics Canada’s labour force survey that measures the number of workers between 15 and 65 years old by their immigration status.

The number had grown three per cent a year, on average, in the previous 10 years.

The data show that the number of permanent residents who have been in Canada for five to 10 years also dropped from 1,170,000 in 2019 to 1,146,000 in 2020.

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5:32 a.m.: A lawmaker with German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s party said Sunday he will give up his seat in parliament and leave politics after it emerged that his company profited from deals to procure masks early in the pandemic — drawing sharp criticism in an election year.

Nikolas Loebel, a backbench lawmaker with Merkel’s centre-right Christian Democratic Union, was blasted by members of his own party and opponents after it emerged Friday that a company he runs earned commissions of 250,000 euros ($298,000) from brokering contracts to buy masks. Saying that he should have been “more sensitive,” Loebel admitted that he had made a mistake and gave up his seat on parliament’s foreign affairs committee.

That wasn’t enough for critics — particularly as his home state of Baden-Wuerttemberg elects a new regional legislature on March 14. A national election in which Germans will choose a new parliament, and determine who succeeds Merkel, follows on Sept. 26.

Susanne Eisenmann, the CDU candidate for governor in Baden-Wuerttemberg, told news magazine Der Spiegel that “it is unacceptable for parliamentarians to enrich themselves in this serious crisis.”

On Sunday, Loebel said he will leave the Union bloc’s group in parliament immediately and give up his seat at the end of August. He apologized and said he won’t run in the September election, the dpa news agency reported.

4:03 a.m.: On Feb. 7, health authorities in Newfoundland and Labrador reported one new case of COVID-19 — an unremarkable number, given that the province’s daily count of new infections had mostly hovered between zero and five since an initial outbreak last spring.

But things were going wrong very quickly.

Young people all over the St. John’s metro region were getting calls from public health officials telling them they were connected to a positive COVID-19 case and they had to isolate for 14 days.

Three days later, with metro-area schools now closed, there were 100 new cases — the highest single-day COVID-19 tally recorded in all of Atlantic Canada since the pandemic began. Nearly three-quarters of those new cases were among people under 20, and all were in the eastern region that includes St. John’s.

On Feb. 12, officials called an evening news conference to announce that the rapidly spreading outbreak was linked to the B.1.1.7 variant, which was first identified in the United Kingdom. Health authorities imposed a provincewide lockdown, prompting the cancellation of in-person voting in the provincial election that was supposed to happen the next day.

Provincial chief medical officer of health Dr. Janice Fitzgerald has said about 565 cases of COVID-19 are now associated with the outbreak, meaning it generated more new cases than the province saw in the previous 11 months. The provincial health authority said there were at least 185 cases across 22 different schools.

4:02 a.m.: Ontario’s drive to bolster staffing in long-term care homes hit hard by COVID-19 is leading to “destabilization” of the province’s home care labour force, a group representing providers said Sunday as it pressed the government to standardize wages for personal support workers.

Sue VanderBent, the CEO of Home Care Ontario, said a group of 50 service organizations is concerned with increasing worker movement from home care to higher wage jobs in long-term care homes, where personal support workers are paid an average of $5 an hour more than they earn in community care settings.

The rate at which workers accept home-care assignments, a key indicator for service delivery levels, have dropped by nearly 40 per cent in recent months, she said.

“This means that when we are asking our staff to go to see a patient, the PSW is saying, ‘No, I’m not interested in doing that job’,” she said. “This is unheard of.”

The province’s long-term care sector has been devastated by the pandemic, where thousands of residents have died and staffing levels have declined dramatically.

The province has created financial and educational incentives in a bid to recruit and retain thousands of PSWs to staff the nursing homes. VanderBent said those measures, when coupled with the wage gap, are enticing workers to leave home-care jobs.

She said her association has been raising the concern with Premier Doug Ford’s government, stressing the “unintended consequences” of the new policies.

“We should be looking down the road and saying, ‘this is the ultimate outcome of investing so heavily in one part of the system and not understanding the labour destabilization that you’re going to create,’” she said.

According to a staffing study released by the province last year, PSWs in Ontario long-term care homes make an average hourly wage of $22.69. That compared to the $17.30 average hourly rate paid to home care PSWs.

4:01 a.m.: The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Sunday March 7, 2021.

There are 884,086 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Canada: 884,086 confirmed cases (29,977 active, 831,896 resolved, 22,213 deaths).The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 2,332 new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 78.88 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 19,244 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 2,749.

There were 21 new reported deaths Saturday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 254 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 36. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.1 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 58.45 per 100,000 people.

There have been 25,066,354 tests completed.

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,005 confirmed cases (91 active, 908 resolved, six deaths).

There were two new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 17.43 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 25 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is four.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people.

There have been 201,316 tests completed.

_ Prince Edward Island: 139 confirmed cases (24 active, 115 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 15.04 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 12 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 111,814 tests completed.

_ Nova Scotia: 1,657 confirmed cases (29 active, 1,563 resolved, 65 deaths).

There were six new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 2.96 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 19 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is three.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 6.64 per 100,000 people.

There have been 362,275 tests completed.

_ New Brunswick: 1,453 confirmed cases (36 active, 1,389 resolved, 28 deaths).

There were six new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 4.61 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 23 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is three.

There were zero new reported deaths Saturday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of two new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.04 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 3.58 per 100,000 people.

There have been 241,147 tests completed.

_ Quebec: 291,924 confirmed cases (7,214 active, 274,245 resolved, 10,465 deaths).

There were 749 new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 84.13 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 4,921 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 703.

There were 10 new reported deaths Saturday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 81 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 12. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.13 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 122.05 per 100,000 people.

There have been 6,426,094 tests completed.

_ Ontario: 306,997 confirmed cases (10,210 active, 289,735 resolved, 7,052 deaths).

There were 990 new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 69.3 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 7,243 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,035.

There were six new reported deaths Saturday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 92 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 13. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.09 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 47.86 per 100,000 people.

There have been 11,147,485 tests completed.

_ Manitoba: 32,170 confirmed cases (1,114 active, 30,151 resolved, 905 deaths).

There were 71 new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 80.77 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 361 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 52.

There was one new reported death Saturday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 12 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.12 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 65.61 per 100,000 people.

There have been 541,269 tests completed.

_ Saskatchewan: 29,593 confirmed cases (1,613 active, 27,584 resolved, 396 deaths).

There were 163 new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 136.85 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,087 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 155.

There were three new reported deaths Saturday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 11 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.13 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 33.6 per 100,000 people.

There have been 588,194 tests completed.

_ Alberta: 135,537 confirmed cases (4,649 active, 128,974 resolved, 1,914 deaths).

There were 341 new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 105.14 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 2,334 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 333.

There was one new reported death Saturday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 31 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.1 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 43.28 per 100,000 people.

There have been 3,445,307 tests completed.

_ British Columbia: 83,107 confirmed cases (4,975 active, 76,752 resolved, 1,380 deaths).

There were zero new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 96.64 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 3,198 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 457.

There were zero new reported deaths Saturday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 25 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.07 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 26.81 per 100,000 people.

There have been 1,969,444 tests completed.

_ Yukon: 72 confirmed cases (zero active, 71 resolved, one deaths).

There were zero new cases Saturday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.38 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,232 tests completed.

_ Northwest Territories: 42 confirmed cases (one active, 41 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 2.21 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 14,849 tests completed.

_ Nunavut: 377 confirmed cases (21 active, 355 resolved, one deaths).

There were four new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 53.36 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 21 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is three.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.54 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,852 tests completed.

4 a.m.: The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of 4:00 a.m. ET on Sunday March 7, 2021.

In Canada, the provinces are reporting 76,108 new vaccinations administered for a total of 2,329,622 doses given. Nationwide, 564,217 people or 1.5 per cent of the population has been fully vaccinated. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 6,146.877 per 100,000.

There were no new vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 2,622,210 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have used 88.84 per cent of their available vaccine supply.

Newfoundland is reporting 4,472 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 24,757 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 47.279 per 1,000. In the province, 1.61 per cent (8,427) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Newfoundland for a total of 35,620 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 6.8 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 69.5 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

P.E.I. is reporting 1,105 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 13,281 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 83.724 per 1,000. In the province, 3.32 per cent (5,273) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to P.E.I. for a total of 14,715 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 9.3 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 90.25 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nova Scotia is reporting 6,657 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 38,676 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 39.631 per 1,000. In the province, 1.48 per cent (14,395) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 61,980 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 6.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 62.4 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

New Brunswick is reporting 7,424 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 33,741 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 43.255 per 1,000. In the province, 1.56 per cent (12,142) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 46,775 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 6.0 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 72.13 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Quebec is reporting 21,533 new vaccinations administered for a total of 532,012 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 62.175 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Quebec for a total of 638,445 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.5 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 83.33 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Ontario is reporting 39,698 new vaccinations administered for a total of 860,412 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 58.575 per 1,000. In the province, 1.84 per cent (270,625) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Ontario for a total of 903,285 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 6.1 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 95.25 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Manitoba is reporting 2,685 new vaccinations administered for a total of 87,622 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 63.632 per 1,000. In the province, 2.19 per cent (30,132) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Manitoba for a total of 124,840 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 9.1 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 70.19 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Saskatchewan is reporting 3,577 new vaccinations administered for a total of 90,456 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 76.713 per 1,000. In the province, 2.38 per cent (28,006) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 74,605 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 6.3 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 121.2 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Alberta is reporting 6,955 new vaccinations administered for a total of 282,674 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 64.214 per 1,000. In the province, 2.06 per cent (90,824) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Alberta for a total of 274,965 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 6.2 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 102.8 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

British Columbia is reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 311,208 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 60.646 per 1,000. In the province, 1.69 per cent (86,865) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to British Columbia for a total of 385,080 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 7.5 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 80.82 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Yukon is reporting 1,660 new vaccinations administered for a total of 21,097 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 505.547 per 1,000. In the territory, 18.75 per cent (7,826) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Yukon for a total of 18,900 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 45 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 111.6 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

The Northwest Territories are reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 19,775 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 438.285 per 1,000. In the territory, 10.10 per cent (4,558) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 19,100 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 42 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 103.5 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nunavut is reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 13,911 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 359.216 per 1,000. In the territory, 13.28 per cent (5,144) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nunavut for a total of 23,900 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 62 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 58.21 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

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