The latest coronavirus news from Canada and around the world Sunday. This file will be updated throughout the day. Web links to longer stories if available.

10:09 p.m.: Gov. Gavin Newsom acknowledged Sunday that state and local health officials have stumbled in distributing the COVID-19 vaccine equitably among Latino and Black communities in California.

Speaking at a mobile vaccination clinic in Inglewood, Newsom said the state needs to “do more and do better” to provide outreach and set up vaccine sites directly in the communities that have been hardest hit by the virus.

“We’re not doing enough. We need to do significantly more programs like this,” he said. “We’ve got to get people back to work. We’ve got to get people back into church. And we’ve got to get people back into school.”

Of the 7.3 million doses administered in California, 2.9 per cent have gone to Black residents, 16 per cent to Latinos and 13 per cent to Asian Americans, compared to 32.7 per cent to white people, according to state data.

Those disparities are reflected to some degree in L.A. County, where 24 per cent of Black residents aged 65 and older have received at least one dose of the vaccine, with Latino seniors at 29 per cent and Asian American seniors at 39 per cent, compared to 43 per cent among white seniors, according to county public health data.

Meanwhile, the COVID-19 death rate for Latinos is triple that of white people in the county, with a daily rate of 48 deaths per 100,000 residents compared to 16 deaths per 100,000 residents for white people, according to county data from mid-January. Black residents were dying at a rate of 23 deaths per 100,000 people.

Newsom, who is facing a recall campaign with nearly 1.1 million signatures, sought to illuminate the state’s efforts to vaccinate “hard-to-reach” and “disproportionately impacted” communities by visiting two sites on Sunday, including the one in Inglewood and another in East L.A.

“We recognize our responsibility to do more,” he said, commenting on a range of initiatives his office is involved in across the state. “We’re focusing on farmworkers. We’re down at Coachella Valley on an equity coalition collaborative focusing on farmworkers and pop-up sites in partnership with ranchers and with farm managers.”

10:08 p.m.: New Zealand will remove remaining coronavirus restrictions from Auckland on Monday after an outbreak discovered in the largest city fades away.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said more than 72,000 tests had found no evidence the virus was spreading in the community.

Auckland was placed into a three-day lockdown this month after a mother, father and daughter tested positive. Another five contacts later tested positive. After the lockdown ended, Auckland continued to have restrictions including on gatherings.

The source of the outbreak remains unclear, although authorities continue to investigate whether there is a connection between infected airline passengers and the mother, who works at a company which cleans laundry for airlines.

New Zealand has an elimination strategy with the coronavirus and has managed to stamp out its spread.

10:07 p.m.: Llamas and alpacas made an appearance Friday afternoon outside the Foyer Saint-Antoine, a 30-bed nursing home in Kent County.

Their appearance was a total surprise to residents and even the rest of her staff, said the home’s executive director Renelle Girouard-Boutilier.

The home has not been able to have any visitors since the region was in yellow phase near the Christmas holidays, she said.

“It’s been a long haul for the residents, so we want to do anything that could brighten their day,” she said.

Owner of Llama-zing adventures, Josée Gautreau, had posted that she would be willing to bring her animals to any retirement home that could use a visit to brighten residents’ spirits and Foyer Saint-Antoine decided to jump at the chance, said Girouard-Boutilier.

Gautreau told the Times & Transcript she had seen an animal owner in Ontario pay a retirement home a similar visit and thought she too could spread similar joy.

Girouard-Boutilier said before COVID, a therapy dog had been a big hit at the home, and she knows many of the residents love animals.

So at 2 p.m. Friday, Gautreau began loading her animals onto the trailer for a field trip.

Sun shining, the llamas and alpacas made their way onto the property about an hour later emerging from a small trailer, surprising a group of staff waiting outside for a surprise unknown as instructed by their executive director.

The nursing home staff and Gautreau’s woolly team made their way around the back of the building where residents were gathered inside in a hall of sorts with windows to see their unexpected visitors.

As the animals approached the windows, an exclamation could be heard from inside. Residents slowly began to make their way to the windows and the animals bounded over a significant snowbank to meet their newest pals.

Through the glass, residents smiled and touched their hands against the glass in delight as Gautreau and her team moved the animals to different windows so different residents could have a chance to get close to the creatures.

9 p.m.: With their pastor behind bars, an Edmonton area church held a service again Sunday where the sermon chastised other churches for bowing to COVID-19 public health restrictions.

RCMP say in a news release that they, along with Alberta Health Services, observed that GraceLife Church held a service that exceeded provincially set gathering limits meant to curb the spread of the virus.

They say police will continue to investigate and decide what to do in consultation with health officials.

GraceLife Pastor James Coates was arrested last week when the church continued to hold services that police allege violated COVID-19 restrictions, and he remains in custody for refusing to agree to bail conditions.

Associate pastor Jacob Spenst conducted Sunday’s service in his place, telling the congregation that messages of support have been pouring in.

Spenst said he spoke with Coates earlier in the morning and the pastor sounded strong.

“If they take one, there will be another that will stand in his place. And when he is gone another will stand in his place, and we’ll continue again and again and again. Why? Because Christ is worthy,” Spenst said in a recording of the sermon posted online.

An Alberta Health Services spokeswoman said the provincial health delivery agency “continues to work within the legislation and co-operatively with the RCMP,” but offered no further comment on the situation.

RCMP said police would not be providing any further updates on Sunday, but may release more details later this week.

Coates’s arrest last Wednesday marked the second time he was charged with breaking public health rules tied to the COVID-19 pandemic. He is to appear in court this Wednesday.

Faith-based services across Alberta are limited to 15 per cent of normal capacity and mask use is mandatory. Physical distancing between members of different households must be maintained.

Provincial rules allow for music and choral singing, but performers must wear masks.

The police fined the church $1,200 in December. A closure order was issued in January, but it was ignored.

Earlier this month, some Alberta faith leaders called on GraceLife to follow COVID-19 public health rules.

Reverend Scott Sharman with the Anglican Diocese of Edmonton said sometimes people should put their talk of rights aside when it’s for the benefit of others.

8:59 p.m.: Students or staff at five public schools in British Columbia have tested positive for the faster-spreading COVID-19 variant first discovered in the United Kingdom, health officials said Sunday.

A statement from the Fraser Health authority says it is working closely to manage exposures at four schools in Surrey and one in the Delta School District.

A statement from the Surrey School District to parents says the strain that originated in the U.K. at two of the schools were connected to positive cases dating back to Jan. 26 because testing for the variants take longer than the standard COVID-19 test.

The three-week delay is too long, said Sarah Otto, a professor in evolutionary biology at the University of B.C.

“We expect it to double every eight to 10 days, and so for every eight- to 10-day delay there’s potentially twice as many other people who have caught it and not know about it.”

The Fraser Health statement says it is working to identify any more connected variant cases to ensure immediate isolation and case management to stop further transmission.

“The variant strain can transmit more quickly and easily but does not seem to cause more severe illness, nor interfere with the effectiveness of vaccines, nor affect our ability to test for the virus,” the statement says.

5:42 p.m.: Canada’s chief public health officer said Sunday that the collective efforts to fight COVID-19 are paying off, even as the country sits at a ‘critical juncture’ in the fight against fast-spreading variants.

Dr. Theresa Tam said on Twitter that COVID-19 disease activity continues to decline and vaccination is heading in the right direction.

“Our collective effort has begun to tip the balance in our favour,” she wrote.

But she said Canadians need to maintain COVID-19 precautions to protect each other, especially as cases of more contagious variants are mounting across the country.

The faster-spreading COVID-19 variant first discovered in the United Kingdom has made its way into some schools in British Columbia, health officials announced late Saturday.

The superintendent of the Surrey School District tweeted a notice that had been issued to parents at Woodward Hill Elementary, Tamanawis Secondary and A.H.P. Matthew Elementary schools.

Cases at least two of the schools date back to late January, but were only recently confirmed to be variant-related because the testing takes longer, Superintendent Jordan Tinney said.

Quebec is also investigating a potential case of the variant at an elementary school in the provincial capital, health officials first announced Saturday

On Sunday, the province was dealing with 23 confirmed cases involving variants of concern as well as 329 presumptive cases under investigation, even as the province reported its lowest number of COVID-19 cases in five months.

But Health Minister Christian Dube warned Quebecers not be lulled into a “false sense of security” by the 666 cases on Sunday, as “the threat of new variants is very present,” he wrote on Twitter.

Ontario, meanwhile, reported 1,087 cases as the province prepared to lift a stay-at-home order in one long-standing hot spot on Monday.

The majority of the province’s regions will then have returned to the province’s colour-coded pandemic response framework, with stay-at-home orders remaining in place in just three regions — Toronto, Peel Region and the North Bay-Parry Sound district.

In a message published Sunday, Tam noted that COVID-19 has had a disproportionate impact on racialized communities. She said cases are 1.5 to 5 times higher in racialized communities in Toronto and Ottawa, while people living on First Nations reserves have a 69 per cent higher rate of infection compared to the general population.

“These disproportionate impacts among racialized and Indigenous communities are not due to biological differences between groups or populations,” she wrote.

“Rather, they reflect existing health inequities that are strongly influenced by a specific set of social and economic factors — things like income, education, employment and housing that shape an individual’s place in society.”

She said it’s imperative to work to fight racism in workplaces, education and health and social services systems, which she said has contributed to vaccine hesitancy in some communities and helped to create the inequitable living and working conditions that make some groups more susceptible to COVID-19.

5:41 p.m.: Los Angeles County public health officials on Sunday reported 1,465 new cases of the coronavirus and 93 related deaths, noting that case numbers are usually lower on the weekends because not all laboratories report results.

Still, the sustained decline in new cases, hospitalizations and deaths suggests the county is turning the corner from a vicious fall and winter surge that killed about 12,000 people. The county has reported more than 1.1 million coronavirus cases overall and nearly 20,000 related deaths since the pandemic began.

There were 2,213 COVID-19 patients in county hospitals as of Saturday, a drop of nearly 46 per cent from two weeks before, when there were 4,079 patients.

Orange County has reported similar trends, on Sunday reporting 252 new cases of the virus, 40 related deaths and 577 hospitalized patients, a drop of about 45 per cent from two weeks before.

Health officials have urged people to continue to remain vigilant about observing safety precautions as several variants of the virus are circulating in Southern California, including the one that emerged in the U.K. and is believed to be 50 per cent more transmissible.

At the same time, efforts to vaccinate people in California, as in other states, have been sluggish due to scarce supplies and weather-related delivery delays that forced the temporary closure of several large-scale distribution sites over the weekend, including those run by the city of Los Angeles like Dodger Stadium, and the Disneyland site in Orange County.

3:18 p.m.: Toronto is reporting 390 new cases of coronavirus, 408 new recoveries and 10 new deaths, bring the local death toll to 2,614.

3:05 p.m.: Saskatchewan, the hardest-hit province for most of the last few weeks as regards active cases per capita, reports 193 new cases on Sunday, boosting its active cased to 1,670 from 1,602 on Saturday. Four new deaths were also reported, bringing the provincial total to 372.

Upticks in Saskatchewan’s far north and Regina provided most of the case increase. The province did administer 2,919 new vaccine doses, to reach the total of 60,763

1:44 p.m.: Manitoba announced 58 new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday and two more deaths on Sunday, Feb. 21, 2021. Recoveries exceeded new cases, lowering active cases from 1,207 to 1,180. Today’s vaccinations totalled 1,611, raising the provincial total to 61,426.

1:30 p.m.: Newfoundland and Labrador reports 25 new cases on Sunday, and 29 recoveries, dropping its active cases to 433 after its surge in cases this month that caused the delay of a provincial election.

1:09 p.m.: Canada’s chief public health officer says the collective efforts to fight COVID-19 are paying off, even as the country sits at a “critical juncture” in the fight against fast-spreading variants.

Dr. Theresa Tam says on Twitter that COVID-19 disease activity continues to decline and vaccination is heading in the right direction as “Our collective effort has begun to tip the balance in our favour.”

But she says Canadians need to maintain COVID-19 precautions to protect each other, especially as cases of more contagious variants are mounting across the country.

Her comments come as Quebec is reporting its lowest number of COVID-19 cases in five months, with 666 new infections and 15 virus-related deaths.

11:36 a.m.: Quebec reported 666 new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday — its lowest daily total since late September — as well as 15 new deaths.

Health Minister Christian Dube said on Twitter that the 666 new infections reported today is the “best day” since Sept 23, when the province reported 687 cases.

With 1,031 new recoveries, the active case total in Quebec has fallen to 8,278. Hospitalizations fell by 14 on Sunday to 686, while the province administered 15,576 doses of vaccine for a total of 344900.

10:49 a.m.: Ontario is reporting another 1,087 COVID-19 cases and 13 more deaths, according to its latest report released Sunday morning.

The province says 48,178 number of tests were completed the previous day for a 2.7 per cent positivity rate. Saturday’s totals were 1,228 new cases, 28 deaths, 57,194 and 2.2 per cent positivity.

There are 660 people currently hospitalized with COVID-19 in the province — down 39 from Saturday’s report — including 277 patients in intensive care (up 14).

Locally, Health Minister Christine Elliott says 344 new cases were reported in Toronto, 156 in Peel Region and 122 in York Region. (Saturday’s numbers: 331, 228 and 132, respectively).

10:40 a.m.: The Pfizer Inc. and BioNTech SE COVID-19 vaccine appeared to stop the vast majority of recipients in Israel becoming infected, providing the first real-world indication that the immunization will curb transmission of the coronavirus.

The vaccine, which was rolled out in a national immunization program that began Dec. 20, was 89.4 per cent effective at preventing laboratory-confirmed infections, according to a copy of a draft publication that was posted on Twitter and confirmed by a person familiar with the work. The companies and Israel’s Health Ministry worked together on the preliminary observational analysis, which has not yet been peer-reviewed.

The results, also reported in Der Spiegel, are the latest in a series of positive data to emerge out of Israel, which has given more COVID-19 vaccines per capita than anywhere else in the world. Nearly half of the population has had at least one dose of vaccine. Separately, Israeli authorities on Saturday said the Pfizer-BioNTech shot was 99 per cent effective at preventing deaths from the virus.

The early results on lab-confirmed infections are important because they show the vaccine may also prevent asymptomatic carriers from spreading the virus that causes COVID-19, something that hadn’t been clear so far. Stopping transmission in this way is a key factor as countries seek to lift contact restrictions and reopen economies.

10:17 a.m.: The British government declared Sunday that every adult in the country should get a first coronavirus vaccine shot by July 31, at least a month earlier than its previous target, as it prepared to set out a “cautious” plan to ease the U.K.’s lockdown.

The new target also aims for everyone 50 and over and those with an underlying health condition to get their first of two vaccine shots by April 15, rather than the previous date of May 1.

The makers of the two vaccines that Britain is using, Pfizer and AstraZeneca, have both experienced supply problems in Europe. But U.K. Health Secretary Matt Hancock said Sunday that “we now think that we have the supplies” to speed up the vaccination campaign.

The early success of Britain’s vaccination effort is welcome good news for a country that has had more than 120,000 coronavirus deaths, the highest toll in Europe. More than 17.2 million people, a third of the country’s adults, have had at lease one vaccine shot since inoculations began on Dec. 8.

Britain is delaying giving second vaccine doses until 12 weeks after the first, rather than three to four weeks, in order to give more people partial protection quickly. The approach has been criticized in some countries — and by Pfizer, which says it does not have any data to support the interval — but it is backed by the U.K. government’s scientific advisers.

Faced with a dominant virus variant that scientists say is both more transmissible and more deadly than the original virus, Britain has spent much of the winter under a tight lockdown. Bars, restaurants, gyms, schools, hair salons and all non-essential shops have been closed; grocery stories, pharmacies and takeout food venues are still open.

The government has stressed that economic and social reopenings will be slow and cautious, with non-essential shopping or outdoor socializing unlikely before April. Many children will go back to school beginning on March 8 and nursing home residents will be able to have one visitor from the same date.

8:56 a.m.: Seven-year-old Carpenter Adoo has earned the nickname “Tiny but Mighty” in short order.

He underwent his first surgery at a week old and spent four months in the neonatal intensive care unit. He’s powered through more than a dozen procedures to keep the excess fluid draining from his brain safely, routinely greeting nurses with hugs and handshakes.

“He handles it all with a grace that I don’t know that I would ever be able to handle it,” Carpenter’s mother, Leah Williamson, said from Memphis.

Carpenter’s medical condition makes him particularly vulnerable to COVID-19, putting him in a population that states are wrestling with how to prioritize as vaccine supplies fall short of demand. Tennessee last month joined a handful of states in moving the families of medically frail children like Carpenter up the vaccine priority list. State officials bumped them above critical infrastructure workers, grocery store employees and inmates, landing in the phase that follows teachers and child care staff.

Williamson was encouraged but still hasn’t gotten answers about when she’ll get her turn.

As the disease’s U.S. death toll climbs to nearly half a million people, the threat to those with chronic health conditions remains high, especially for those younger than 16 who aren’t approved for the shots yet. Williamson hopes that lends urgency to the state of Tennessee’s willingness to give her a vaccine.

7 a.m.: Vaccines are one miracle of science in this pandemic. But another scientific experiment has also produced surprisingly speedy and widespread results over the past year. It happened in the realm of behaviour science — and ordinary citizens were the laboratory subjects.

One year ago, few people would have believed that science would come up with a vaccine, ready for mass immunization around the world, by the start of 2021.

But who would have also predicted that citizens could be persuaded to turn their lives upside down, wear masks and isolate themselves from their families and friends for months on end?

“I know we’re asking a lot,” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in early April, when no one knew just how much COVID-19 would force Canadians into behaviour change on a grand scale. “A lot” is an understatement: not since wartime has the government had to request this much of the citizenry for so long.

Yet while the government’s medical scientists have been front and centre on the public stage almost every day since last March, the behavioural scientists have mostly been operating under the radar. If you know where to look, though, evidence of the behaviour-nudging team keeps peeking out under all those public proclamations from Canada’s COVID-19 crisis managers.

Read more of this story from the Star’s Susan Delacourt.

6:01 a.m.: Canadians perusing social media may be coming across photos of their American peers bearing wide smiles and vaccination cards that show they’ve been inoculated against COVID-19.

A recent ramping up of the United States’s vaccine rollout has it vastly outpacing its northern neighbour, and some Canadians are wondering why distribution here is lagging so far behind.

Dr. Krutika Kuppalli, an infectious disease doctor in South Carolina, says that while the speed of the American rollout has been impressive lately, it’s not been without its faults.

Communication between states has been mostly lacking, she says, and the absence of a uniform standard for vaccine eligibility has led to inconsistencies across jurisdictions. Some states, for example, include teachers high on their priority list while others are still working on inoculating those 80 years and older.

Confusion in the early stages of the rollout caused frustration and dampened trust, she added. And while the shift to a new presidential administration last month has led to some improvements, Kuppalli says there’s room for more.

Loading…

Loading…Loading…Loading…Loading…Loading…

5:42 a.m.: Israel paid Russia $1.2 million to provide the Syrian government with coronavirus vaccine doses as part of a deal that secured the release of an Israeli woman held captive in Damascus, according to Israeli media reports.

The terms of the clandestine tradeoff orchestrated by Moscow between the two enemy nations remained murky. But the fact that Israel is providing vaccines to Syria — an enemy country hosting hostile Iranian forces — has drawn criticism at home. It has also drawn attention to Israel’s refusal to provide significant quantities to millions of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip.

Speaking at a news conference Saturday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said “not one Israeli vaccine” was involved in the deal. But he did not address the issue of whether Israel paid for Russian vaccines, and he said Russia insisted on keeping details of the swap secret.

The Prime Minister’s Office has declined further comment.

5:17 a.m.: Israel lifted many of its coronavirus restrictions and started reopening its economy Sunday as the country’s vaccination drive and third nationwide lockdown have started to bring down infections.

Most grade school and high school classes have reopened after a nearly two-month closure, along with museums, libraries, malls and markets. Some restrictions on the number of people in attendance remain in place. The entire education system is expected to return to normal operations early March.

Gyms, pools, cinemas and restaurants are opening back up for people who have received two doses of the coronavirus vaccine.

Israel unveiled its plan to allow the vaccinated to attend cultural events, fly abroad and patronize restaurants and health clubs by using a “green badge” app on Saturday ahead of the reopening of the economy. The rollout of the app has been fraught with technical difficulties.

4:01 a.m.: The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Sunday Feb. 21, 2021.

There are 843,301 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Canada: 843,301 confirmed cases (31,830 active, 789,841 resolved, 21,630 deaths). The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 2,715 new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 83.75 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 19,496 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 2,785.

There were 54 new reported deaths Saturday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 392 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 56. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.15 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 56.91 per 100,000 people.

There have been 23,612,896 tests completed.

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 901 confirmed cases (437 active, 460 resolved, four deaths).

There were 38 new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 83.7 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 215 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 31.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 0.77 per 100,000 people.

There have been 183,360 tests completed.

_ Prince Edward Island: 115 confirmed cases (two active, 113 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 1.25 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of one new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 98,244 tests completed.

_ Nova Scotia: 1,608 confirmed cases (18 active, 1,525 resolved, 65 deaths).

There were four new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 1.84 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 16 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 6.64 per 100,000 people.

There have been 310,559 tests completed.

_ New Brunswick: 1,420 confirmed cases (88 active, 1,308 resolved, 24 deaths).

There were three new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 11.26 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 22 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is three.

There were zero new reported deaths Saturday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of two new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.04 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 3.07 per 100,000 people.

There have been 230,122 tests completed.

_ Quebec: 281,456 confirmed cases (8,658 active, 262,506 resolved, 10,292 deaths).

There were 769 new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 100.97 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 5,576 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 797.

There were 14 new reported deaths Saturday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 91 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 13. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.15 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 120.03 per 100,000 people.

There have been 6,059,756 tests completed.

_ Ontario: 291,999 confirmed cases (10,437 active, 274,714 resolved, 6,848 deaths).

There were 1,228 new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 70.84 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 7,112 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,016.

There were 28 new reported deaths Saturday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 197 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 28. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.19 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 46.48 per 100,000 people.

There have been 10,442,332 tests completed.

_ Manitoba: 31,329 confirmed cases (1,207 active, 29,240 resolved, 882 deaths).

There were 94 new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 87.51 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 642 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 92.

There were three new reported deaths Saturday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 16 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.17 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 63.95 per 100,000 people.

There have been 515,740 tests completed.

_ Saskatchewan: 27,438 confirmed cases (1,602 active, 25,468 resolved, 368 deaths).

There were 193 new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 135.91 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,049 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 150.

There were three new reported deaths Saturday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 14 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.17 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 31.22 per 100,000 people.

There have been 553,092 tests completed.

_ Alberta: 130,735 confirmed cases (4,803 active, 124,114 resolved, 1,818 deaths).

There were 380 new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 108.62 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 2,195 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 314.

There were six new reported deaths Saturday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 43 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is six. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.14 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 41.11 per 100,000 people.

There have been 3,331,615 tests completed.

_ British Columbia: 75,835 confirmed cases (4,538 active, 69,970 resolved, 1,327 deaths).

There were zero new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 88.16 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 2,633 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 376.

There were zero new reported deaths Saturday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 29 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 25.78 per 100,000 people.

There have been 1,857,754 tests completed.

_ Yukon: 72 confirmed cases (two active, 69 resolved, one deaths).

There were zero new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 4.76 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of one new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.38 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,029 tests completed.

_ Northwest Territories: 42 confirmed cases (eight active, 34 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 17.71 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of four new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 13,858 tests completed.

_ Nunavut: 338 confirmed cases (30 active, 307 resolved, one deaths).

There were six new cases Saturday. The rate of active cases is 76.23 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 30 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is four.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.54 per 100,000 people.

4 a.m.: The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Sunday Feb. 21, 2021.

In Canada, the provinces are reporting 49,707 new vaccinations administered for a total of 1,451,846 doses given. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 3,830.801 per 100,000.

There were no new vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 1,851,710 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have used 78.41 per cent of their available vaccine supply.

Newfoundland is reporting 1,771 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 16,458 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 31.431 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Newfoundland for a total of 24,460 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 4.7 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 67.29 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

P.E.I. is reporting 1,552 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 10,691 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 67.396 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to P.E.I. for a total of 13,045 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 8.2 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 81.95 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nova Scotia is reporting 2,689 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 25,032 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 25.65 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 47,280 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 4.8 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 52.94 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

New Brunswick is reporting 2,539 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 21,182 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 27.155 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 35,015 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 4.5 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 60.49 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Quebec is reporting 17,673 new vaccinations administered for a total of 329,324 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 38.487 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Quebec for a total of 401,685 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 4.7 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 81.99 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Ontario is reporting 21,295 new vaccinations administered for a total of 540,129 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 36.771 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Ontario for a total of 683,255 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 4.7 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 79.05 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Manitoba is reporting 841 new vaccinations administered for a total of 59,815 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 43.439 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Manitoba for a total of 84,810 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 6.2 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 70.53 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Saskatchewan is reporting 4,794 new vaccinations administered for a total of 57,824 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 49.039 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 59,395 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 5.0 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 97.35 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Alberta is reporting 5,104 new vaccinations administered for a total of 165,527 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 37.602 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Alberta for a total of 205,875 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 4.7 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 80.4 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

British Columbia is reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 192,942 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 37.599 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to British Columbia for a total of 243,490 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 4.7 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 79.24 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Yukon is reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 11,850 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 283.962 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Yukon for a total of 18,900 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 45 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 62.7 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

The Northwest Territories are reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 14,157 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 313.77 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 19,100 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 42 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 74.12 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nunavut is reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 6,915 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 178.562 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nunavut for a total of 15,400 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 40 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 44.9 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

There have been 8,359 tests completed.

Read Saturday’s coronavirus news



Source link